It is impossible for one to be internationalist without being a nationalist. Internationalism is possible only when nationalism becomes a fact, i.e. when peoples belonging to different countries have organized themselves and are able to act as one man. It is not nationalism that is evil, it is the narrowness, selfishness, exclusiveness which is the bane of modern nations which is evil. Each wants to profit at the expense of, and rise on the ruin of, the other.

Indian nationalism has struck a different path. It wants to organize itself or to find full self-expression for the benefit and service of humanity at large … God having cast my lot in the midst of the people of India, I should be untrue to my Maker if I failed to serve them. If I do not know how to serve them I shall never know how to serve humanity. And I cannot possibly go wrong so long as I do not harm other nations in the act of serving my country.

Mahatma Gandhi (Young India, 18 June 1925, p211)

NON-COOPERATION WITH EVIL IS AS MUCH A DUTY AS IS COOPERATION WITH GOOD (GANDHI)

NON-COOPERATION WITH EVIL IS AS MUCH A DUTY AS IS COOPERATION WITH GOOD (GANDHI)

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ALL TRUTH PASSES THROUGH THREE STAGES; FIRST, IT IS RIDICULED, SECOND, IT IS VIOLENTLY OPPOSED, THIRD, IT IS ACCEPTED AS BEING SELF-EVIDENT. (Arthur Schopenhauer)

I WILL TELL YOU ONE THING FOR SURE. ONCE YOU GET TO THE POINT WHERE YOU ARE ACTUALLY DOING THINGS FOR TRUTH'S SAKE, THEN NOBODY CAN EVER TOUCH YOU AGAIN BECAUSE YOU ARE HARMONIZING WITH A GREATER POWER. (George Harrison)

THE WORLD ALWAYS INVISIBLY AND DANGEROUSLY REVOLVES AROUND PHILOSOPHERS (Nietzsche)

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Forest fires in Uttarakhand could melt glaciers faster: Experts

May 03 2016 

Black Carbon May Raise Heat, Pollute Rivers

Raging forest fires in Uttarakhand could have a devastating effect on the state's glaciers which are the lifeline of the major rivers flowing through India's northern plains. According to experts at Nainital's Aryabhatta Research Institute for Observational Sciences (ARIES) and Govind Ballabh Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development (GBPIHED) in Almora, `black carbon' from the smog and ash is covering the glaciers, thereby making them prone to melting. 

Elaborating on what he termed a `long lasting effect' of the fires, Manish Kumar, a senior scientist at the atmospherics department in ARIES, told TOI, “Black carbon is formed by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, biofuels and biomass. It absorbs light and increases heat, which is why it can cause glaciers to melt faster.“ Water in the rivers which originate from these glaciers also stand to get heavily polluted by harmful particles and compounds that constitute black carbon, Kumar said. 

According to experts, forest fires have already resulted in a jump of 0.2 degrees Celsius in temperatures across northern India which can have a detrimental effect on the monsoons. “Black carbon floats in air for a long time and gets deposited on clouds interfering with the normal cycle of the monsoons,“ said Kirit Kumar, a scientist from Govind Ballabh Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development, Almora. Other experts, however, said the interaction of black carbon with clouds was complex and could have varied effects. 

The glaciers which are most at risk, according to Kumar of ARIES, are those that are situated at relatively low altitudes such as Gangotri, Milam, Sundardunga, Newla and Cheepa, which are also the source of many rivers. In order to study the effect that the fires are having on these glaciers, a team of scientists from GBPIHED would soon undertake a scientific trip to these heights. 



Timber-Land Mafia Nexus Under Lens Over Fire 

Probe Ordered, 4 Arrested For Starting Blaze In Pauri 

The Uttarakhand forest fire is turning out to be a largely man-made disaster which has so far caused damage worth over Rs 2,500 crore with reports that a nexus of villagers and timberland mafia could be behind the blaze. 

A preliminary fact-finding report suggested that the fire started following the routine burning of fallen leaves and forest areas by villagers so that they can grow grass and fodder for their livestock. But the controlled act went out of hand due to the hot weather and dry vegetation and the villagers could not douse the fire before it engulfed a larger area. 

“We need to find out whether the villagers could actually not control the fire or some of them did it deliberately in collusion with the timber mafia,“ an official said. A team of experts has reached Uttarakhand to ascertain the cause of fire and extent of damage. 

Fours persons have been arrested for starting fires in Pauri Garhwal. “Their role will be probed and action will be taken accordingly,“ environment minister Prakash Javadekar said on Monday. Refusing to comment on the possible involvement of the timber mafia, the minister said a probe had been ordered and the culprits would be brought to book. “Not a single inch of forest land will be allowed to be encroached by anybody,“ he said. 

Builders are keen to get forest land cleared so that they can go ahead with their expansion plan on encroached land.They take villagers on board and also take the timber mafia along as part of a bigger nexus. “Since it cannot happen without the help of forest officials, the probe will also look into their roles, if any, in the disaster,“ an official said. 


Uttarakhand's forests have many varieties of commercially viable trees like sal, oak, acacia and conifers. Since fire usually damages only the lower portion of trees, the upper portion can be used. Before this fire, till April 21, the state had reported 291 forest fires.

“The Centre is taking the fires very seriously. Over 6,000 people have been deployed. We have also granted Rs 5 crore to the state,“ Javadekar said.

The matter was also raised in Lok Sabha, to which home minister Rajnath Singh said that the Centre had brought the fire under control.

SOURCE

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